The Club

We firmly believe that Ross County Football Club belongs to the fans. They are the lifeblood of the club and are responsible for where we are today. They deserve not only a team but also a club that they can be proud to call their own.

Thus, we are committed to providing entertainment for our supporters on match days but also to being an active and important presence in communities across the Highlands and Islands region through our Youth and Community activities.

We have worked hard to earn a reputation as one of the friendliest clubs in the country, not just amongst our own fans but also with other clubs and their fans. We aim to provide every person visiting The Global Energy Stadium with a friendly and courteous welcome and a memorable match day experience - whether they are a visiting manager or supporter. We are also committed to ensuring that no person or group is discriminated against or disadvantaged for any reason.

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Getting to the Ground

The ground is well signposted once you reach Dingwall and our full address including the postcode for Sat-Nav is The Global Energy Stadium, Victoria Park, Dingwall IV15 9QZ.

We are located only 5 minutes’ walk from the centre of town and less than 500 metres from the Train Station. If using service buses to get to the match then the stop located on Hill Street (beside the Royal Hotel) is the closest to the ground and included on most of the main routes to and from the town and is just a couple of minutes’ walk from the ground.

There is ample free and well signposted car parking in Dingwall Town Centre, whilst there is also car parking available for both home and away fans at the ground on matchdays at a cost of £3. Please note spaces are extremely limited for larger games and if in doubt please call to check the situation before leaving. Also note that the standard matchday traffic arrangements implemented by the Council Traffic Wardens and Police Scotland mean that access to the Stadium by car is not possible in the final 30 minutes before kick-off at any game.

Please bear in mind that weather and road conditions can vary greatly both from area to area and indeed compared with previous forecasts. Therefore we would ask all fans, and particularly those travelling longer distances, to check the up to date weather situation and forecast as well as road conditions and incidents before making the decision to travel for any match. Up to date information can always be found at www.trafficscotland.info

For information on all public transport including timetables and a journey planner tool, check www.travelinescotland.com

 

The Jailend South Stand

Located behind the goals, the South Stand does not offer such a good view of the game but is traditionally the noisy section of the home support. Popular with fans who've been coming to the ground for longer than they'd care to remember and the younger generation of Staggies alike.

The East Stand

Running down the touchline, the East Stand offers a great view of the game although as it is accessed by walking along the rear of the Jailend South Stand, it is less suited for fans with mobility issues. The "Original" East Stand is located more centrally and offers great views of the game, whilst the "Extension" (added in 2012) is closer to the noisy Jailend Support.

The West Stand

Running down the touchline, the West Stand offers good views of the game as well as being the stand most sheltered from the elements and is also the most easily accessible stand for fans with limited mobility as it is closest to the town. Effectively split down the middle by the tunnel and camera positions, we recommend the "Original" section for fans who want to be closer to the noisy support of the Jailend, while the "New" section offers better toilet and tea bar facilities and tends to be popular with families as well as fans with limited mobility.

The North (Away) Stand

Although it is located behind the goals, having only been built in 2012 the Away Stand offers excellent views of the game as well as being well catered for in terms of toilets and catering facilities. For those unfamiliar with the ground, when arriving at the ground over the Railway Bridge from the town centre the North Stand is at the far end of the ground.

Entering the Highland League in 1929, Ross County Football Club established a ground at Victoria Park, Dingwall and a club badge incorporating the Caberfeidh or Stag's Head from the regimental badge of the Seaforth Highlanders.

In their first season in the Highland League, Ross County lifted the North of Scotland Cup and over the years gained a reputation for playing attractive and high quality football as they lifted several further trophies both before and after the Second World War.

It was not until Season 1966/67 that the club succeeded in winning the Highland League Championship. The team that achieved this did so with a squad comprised largely of local boys: Sandy Wallace, Jimmy Hosie, Don MacMillan, Jackie Lornie et al.

The next League success was not to come until 1990/91, but the team then successfully repeated the trick the following season. It was these back-to-back successes which gave the then club Chairman, Hector MacLennan, the confidence to apply for membership of the Scottish Football League when restructuring saw a requirement for new teams to be admitted for the 1994/95 season.

Following a carefully orchestrated campaign, Hector travelled down to make his presentation to the League accompanied by Club Secretary, Donnie MacBean and thanks to the skills of Hector and Donnie - as well as the countless people who had worked behind the scenes to prepare the bid - Ross County succeeded in gaining admission to the Third Division.

The club then began a programme of building both on and off the park and the strengthened team rose to the new challenges presented by the League and in Season 1998-99 won the Third Division Championship. The following season County won promotion to the First Division.

A season-long return to the Second Division soon after was in many ways the first step in building and renewing foundations which have subsequently taken the Club to the greatest successes in its history. It would not be long before the club were back up in the First Division, however, and under new manager, Derek Adams, County earned their place in the 2010 Scottish Cup Final after a memorable cup run that had seen the club defeat Celtic at the national stadium in the Semi Final.

Defeat to Dundee United followed in the final but in the 2011/12 the club won the First Division - and promotion to the SPL - by a record breaking margin. Ross County also became the first club in Scotland to secure four separate championship titles: Highland League, Third, Second and First Division.

The First Division Champions unfurled the flag on Saturday the 4th of August 2012 ahead of the Club's debut match in the SPL. A top six finish in the league would follow that year but by September 2014 - and with new manager, Jim McIntyre hired to lead County out of the relegation zone - a new era was ushered in. The ‘great escape’ would be achieved in the 2014/5 season and this was followed up with the club registering a top six finish in the 2015/16 season and making history by lifting their first ever major trophy. The 2-1 victory over Hibernian in the League Cup will live long in the memory of Staggies everywhere as will the semi final defeat of Celtic.

At time of writing (August 2017), Ross County have just kicked off what will be their sixth consecutive season in the Scottish top flight. With a stadium and training facilities that are the envy of many a club in the division - and under the stewardship of Chairman, Roy MacGregor - there’s never a better time to be a Staggie!